Search Results for: sudoers

sudo tutorial

sudo allows you to run a Unix command as a different user. Using /etc/sudoers file to confirm what privileges are available to you, this command effectively elevates your access rights, thus allowing you to run commands and access files which would otherwise be not available to you.

How sudo command works

The real and effective user id (uid) and group id (gid) are set to match those of the target user as specified in /etc/sudoers file (the safest way to change this file is to use the visudo command - check out the visudo tutorial). The way you use sudo is simple enough: you run this command and specify a command line you'd like to run with the privileges of a different user. Before the requested command is run, you are asked to confirm your identify by providing your user password.

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Using visudo

Using visudo allows for updates to sudoers file on your system to be made in an easy and safe way.

Essentially, visudo is a wrapper script around vi editor (or any other editor of your preference), which  locks the sudoers file against multiple simultaneous edits, checks for the correct sudoers file syntax, and provides other sanity checks.

Please consult the visudo tutorial post for further information.

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visudo tutorial

visudo is a tool for safely updating the /etc/sudoers file, found in most Linux systems (Ubuntu for example).

Here's what the Ubuntu man page says about it, I think it's a great summary:

visudo edits the sudoers file in a safe fashion, analogous to vipw(8). visudo locks the sudoers file against multiple simultaneous edits, provides basic sanity checks, and checks for parse errors. If the sudoers file is currently being edited you will receive a message to try again later.

Attention: due to the sensitive content of the /etc/sudoers file, you can only run visudo as root.

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Ubuntu: Using Sudo to Grant User Privileges

If you have used your fresh Ubuntu install for longer than half an hour, chances are that you've discovered the sudo command already.

sudo allows certain users to execute a command under another user's privileges. Most commonly, using sudo implies running a command as a superuser, but the approach works equally well for allowing you to inherit a user ID (uid) and group ID (gid) of any user on the system.

To gain access, a password is asked, and by default it is your password, and not the password of a user you're trying to run a command as. This allows for the system' s administrator to effectively manage user privileges without having any user share their password.

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